FarmSoft Studios Graphic Design & Web Design

Inspiration. Diligence. Excellence. The Art of Design.

Welcome to FarmSoft Studios! Located in the rolling hills of Hillsboro, Wisconsin, our goal as a company is to create quality web sites that are completely W3C standards-compliant, stunning graphics that make your company's identity stand out, and usability that will flex to users in all walks of life. We love paying attention to detail, while making products that our clients are completely satisfied with. Please Contact Us for more details on how we can serve your needs.

FarmSoft Studios Graphic Design & Web Design; Inspiration. Diligence. Excellence. The Art of Design.
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Recent Blog Posts:

SSD Performance

So, I finally took the plunge, and purchased a Samsung 840 Pro SSD (Solid State Drive) for my MacBook Pro.

Before

DiskSpeedTest

After

SSD Performance

Wow. Couldn’t be happier! The speeds are incredible. Boot times are fast. I feel like I have a new computer again!

Grab yourself one here on Amazon!  Samsung Electronics 840 Pro Series 2.5-Inch 512 SATA_6_0_gb Solid State Drive MZ-7PD512BW

Or, if you really need the extra longevity and extra capacity, the 850 pro is out and has even better specs:

512MB Samsung Electronics 850 Pro-Series 2.5″ 512GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive Single Unit Version MZ-7KE512BW

1TB Samsung Electronics 850 Pro-Series 2.5″ 1TB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive Single Unit Version MZ-7KE1T0BW

Posted By: FarmSoft Studios on September 30, 2014 @ 8:21 pm — Comments (0)

Flashing IT Firmware onto an LSI 9300-8i HBA Using EFI

This KB article is based on the excellent work of Bryan Vyhmeister.  This post is mostly so that I can reference the information for myself in the future.

Step 1

Locate the Firmware and BIOS packages from LSI.  The firmware files are located inside the 9300_8i_Package_P6_IR_IT_Firmware_BIOS_for_MSDOS_Windows.zip, even though you won’t be using DOS to flash the firmware.  Copy the flash utility sas3flash.efi, the BIOS ROM image, and the firmware image to your thumb drive.  My directory listing was something like:

sas3flash.efi
mptsas3.rom
SAS9300_8i_IT.bin

Step 2

Boot into the EFI shell.  On my Super Micro board, the boot menu is summoned by hitting the F11 key during boot.  Plug in your thumb drive, and figure out which device it is with the map command.  It is usually something like fs0.  Mount the drive, using:

mount fs0:

To change to that drive, just type the drive name followed by a colon:

fs0:

You can list the contents of the drive with the ls command.  You should see the firmware files and the flash utility. You want to invoke the sas3flash.efi utility with the following arguments:

sas2flash.efi -o -e 6

This erases the current firmware. Rebooting at this point will allegedly brick your controller. Don’t say that I didn’t warn you.

Now, reflash the new firmware onto the controller:

sas3flash.efi -o -f SAS9300_8i_IT.bin -b mptsas3.rom

After that completes, you can see if your flash was successful by issuing a sas3flash.efi -listall. You should see your new firmware version listed.

Posted By: FarmSoft Studios on September 17, 2014 @ 9:34 am — Comments (0)

ZFS Disk Replacement

The FreeNAS box at work had several failed drives, and so I went to replace them. Here is the process that I went through, more as a future reference for myself than anything else..

[root@storage] ~# zpool status
  pool: CCWIS
 state: DEGRADED
status: One or more devices could not be used because the label is missing or
	invalid.  Sufficient replicas exist for the pool to continue
	functioning in a degraded state.
action: Replace the device using 'zpool replace'.
   see: http://www.sun.com/msg/ZFS-8000-4J
config:

	NAME                       STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
	CCWIS                      DEGRADED     0     0     0
	  raidz2-0                 DEGRADED     0     0     0
	    4366606079408662145    FAULTED      0     0     0  was /dev/da0
	    da0                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da1                    ONLINE       0     0 7.54M
	    da2                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da3                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da4                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da5                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da6                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	  raidz2-1                 DEGRADED     0     0     0
	    da7                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da8                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da9                    ONLINE       0     0     0
	    1934325996798925177    FAULTED      0     0     0  was /dev/da11
	    da11                   ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da12                   ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da13                   ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da14                   ONLINE       0     0     0

errors: No known data errors

So, here we see that we have two failed disks, as well as another one on the way out.  Gotta love WD Green drives.  I want to replace the disk in the lower pool first, since that has been dead the longest, and has the replacement drive already reinserted.

The confusing thing to me was the fact that I am offlining /dev/da11, which appears to be in the pool.  I guess the labels jogged down, and are unrelated to the vdev.  So, we issue a:

[root@storage] ~# zpool offline CCWIS /dev/da11

then

[root@storage] ~# zpool replace CCWIS /dev/da11

Then you wait. A long [13h22m] time. :)

After the resilvering completed for the first failed drive, I was left with the “phantom” drive, which can be cleared by it’s own ID number:

[root@storage] ~# zpool detach CCWIS 1934325996798925177
[root@storage] ~# zpool status 
  pool: CCWIS
 state: DEGRADED
status: One or more devices has been taken offline by the administrator.
	Sufficient replicas exist for the pool to continue functioning in a
	degraded state.
action: Online the device using 'zpool online' or replace the device with
	'zpool replace'.
  scan: resilvered 483G in 13h22m with 0 errors on Tue Sep  9 00:32:09 2014
config:

	NAME                     STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
	CCWIS                    DEGRADED     0     0     0
	  raidz2-0               DEGRADED     0     0     0
	    4366606079408662145  OFFLINE      0     0     0  was /dev/da0
	    da0                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da1                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da2                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da3                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da4                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da5                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da6                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	  raidz2-1               ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da7                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da8                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da9                  ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da10                 ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da11                 ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da12                 ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da13                 ONLINE       0     0     0
	    da14                 ONLINE       0     0     0

errors: No known data errors

 

Posted By: FarmSoft Studios on September 9, 2014 @ 8:17 am — Comments (0)

What the media won’t tell you about Heartbleed

An excellent article from one of the developers at OpenSSL.

I stand in awe of their talent and dedication, that of Stephen Henson in particular. It takes nerves of steel to work for many years on hundreds of thousands of lines of very complex code, with every line of code you touch visible to the world, knowing that code is used by banks, firewalls, weapons systems, web sites, smart phones, industry, government, everywhere. Knowing that you’ll be ignored and unappreciated until something goes wrong. The combination of the personality to handle that kind of pressure with the relevant technical skills and experience to effectively work on such software is a rare commodity, and those who have it are likely to already be a valued, well-rewarded, and jealously guarded resource of some company or worthy cause. For those reasons OpenSSL will always be undermanned, but the present situation can and should be improved.

http://veridicalsystems.com/blog/of-money-responsibility-and-pride/

Please read it and pass it on.

Posted By: FarmSoft Studios on April 14, 2014 @ 8:34 am — Comments (0)

Resetting your Ghost Blog password

Didn’t set up Mailgun in your Ghost blog, and lost your password? Hmm. A little bit of fancy-footwork, and we can be back up and running in no time.

 

You’ll need to reset the password in the SQLite DB by manually inserting a new hash into the DB.

  • Get access to your DB from the console, or through a gui tool if you have it.
  • If you are going through the console, CD to your ghost webroot, (the DB is under content/data/) and then type: sqlite3 ghost.db
  • Generate a temporary BCrypt hash (Find a generator online. I used this one: http://bcrypthashgenerator.apphb.com/)
  • Or just use this hash which is for “password”: $2a$10$BQToDNdBtBKCvnrTmMi5m.NK.7i6Qx7YASs.jTkE86I5zqxzE8klC
  • Type UPDATE users SET password='<<PASTE_HASH_HERE>>' WHERE email = '<<YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS>>'
  • Type .exit to exit sqlite3
  • Log into your blog, and change your password to something secure.
  • Set up an email service at Mailgun as detailed here: http://docs.ghost.org/mail/
Posted By: FarmSoft Studios on January 11, 2014 @ 3:28 pm — Comments Off